My child seems more anxious than usual. Is this normal with a concussion?

A concussion can cause a child to become anxious, or if a child has pre-existing anxiety their symptoms may worsen with a concussion.

There are many concerns that could lead a child with a concussion to be anxious. For some children, concerns with falling behind in school, not participating in sports, fear of reinjury or an unknown recovery period can lead to feelings of anxiety.

For some children, providing supportive feedback and reassurance can help them manage their anxiety. Others may need additional resources such as a school counsellor, school psychologist or other community based mental health services to cope with their anxiety.

Early intervention is key. Contact your healthcare professional if you are concerned about your child or if they have any of the following warning signs:

  1. Symptoms of anxiety with a change or deterioration in functioning at school or in relationships with family or peers
  2. Symptoms of anxiety or other emotional changes (e.g. acting out) that lasts longer than 3 months
  3. Any expression of self-harm or suicidal thinking

More information on supporting a child’s emotional well-being can be found in the Resources section.

Your child may need additional resources such as a school counsellor, school psychologist or other community based mental health services to help them cope with anxiety